Feast on the Street

Feast on the Street
FEAST on the STREET brought our community together around a half-mile long dining table in downtown Phoenix, transforming First Street into a pedestrian promenade in celebration of food and art in the desert. This free public event was initiated by the ASU Art Museum and the Desert Initiative, Roosevelt Row CDC and the artists Clare Patey and Matthew Moore. The project was formed by community partnerships across the Valley and ASU—including the College of Public Programs and the Global Institute of Sustainability--with generous support of our major funders: ArtPlace, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Steele Foundation.

Clare Patey and Matthew Moore: Cu²⁹: Mining For You!

Clare Patey and Matthew Moore: Cu²⁹: Mining For You!
Artists Mathew Moore (Phoenix) and Clare Patey (London) collaborated on a project centered on the issue of endangered elements in the periodic table, specifically copper. Copper plays a major role in Arizona’s history and in its current economic, environmental and cultural life. The exhibit explored the process of staking a claim, the idea of owning the Earth’s natural resources, and our dependence on copper for everything from saucepans to cellphones. The project was generously supported by the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation, the City of Tempe, Dr. Eric Jungermann, Tana and Ridge Smidt, Donna and Howard Stone, the British Council, Target, the Advisory Board of the ASU Art Museum, Friends of the ASU Art Museum, Four Points Sheraton and the Wilhelmine Prinzen Endowment at the ASU Art Museum.

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer: Miracle Report

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer: Miracle Report
Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer spent their Social Studies residency at the ASU Art Museum searching for miracles. The artists explored the miraculous through conversations with students, faculty, school children and community members. They approached the subject matter as “curious amateurs,” and their interviews explored the history of the word “miracle,” its secular and religious meanings, and the relationship between miracles and daily experience. This project was supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Jennifer Nelson: Securing a Free State

Jennifer Nelson: Securing a Free State
Securing a free state: The Second Amendment Project is one in a series of projects by artist Jennifer Nelson exploring the United States Bill of Rights. This exhibition was supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Gregory Sale: It's not just black and white

Gregory Sale: It
Phoenix-based artist Gregory Sale developed a three-month project that began as a collaboration with fourteen inmates enrolled in a small re-entry/rehabilitation program offered by the Maricopa County Sheriff, Joe Arpaio. The project’s intent was to give voice to the multiple constituencies of incarceration and criminal justice systems. The ASU Art Museum gallery space operated as a site for developing and displaying visual and mediated exhibitions, dance and other staged events, discussions and readings. Funding support for this project was provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Jillian McDonald: Alone Together in the Dark

Jillian McDonald: Alone Together in the Dark
Fifth in the Social Studies series, New York-based Canadian artist Jillian McDonald explored sustainability in the museum while including grassroots, community conversations. McDonald’s initial thoughts on the project were to investigate haunted sites, ghosts and abandoned houses, focusing on ideas around sustainable living, ghost towns and Day of the Dead.

Paulo Nenflidio: Gambiarra

 Paulo Nenflidio: Gambiarra
The concept of "gambiarra" applies to the resourcefulness of people living on the streets in Brazil who repair and re-invent readily accessible objects. The term can also be applied to the similarly ingenious work of musicians, poets and artists. During his six-week residency, gambiarra drove the work of Brazilian artist Paulo Nenflidio. Relying on donated household materials and appliances such as old radios and electronics, the artist set out to construct sculptural instruments that could be played individually or in an environment in which participants could collectively create a cacophony of sound. This project was made possible through funding provided by F.A.R. (Future Arts Research) @ Arizona State University and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support provided by Friends of the ASU Art Museum.

Anila Rubiku: Sunsex in Arizona

Anila Rubiku: Sunsex in Arizona
Rubiku’s project at ASU Art Museum created a story told through stitched leather. Each individually stitched section was joined together to form a large wall-sized work. The artist spoke about the project: “The pieces come together to tell a story. This is how I see Arizona; it’s so large and growing so much. This is because of the human element; we build houses because families need them. As families grow our urban development must also grow with them. This story is also formed by the desert, and the shapes and elements of the desert become a sort of erotic and humorous symbol for procreation and growth in both the human sense and with respect to urban building.” Rubiku's residency was generously funded by CEC ArtsLink, N.Y. The ASU Art Museum also acknowledges the following for their additional in-kind assistance with the residency: Taliesin West, Comfort Inn of Tempe, The Tempe Convention and Visitors Bureau, and Moroso.

Josh Greene: Some Parts Might Be Greater Than the Whole

Josh Greene: Some Parts Might Be Greater Than the Whole
Museum visitors often say that a work of art inspires them, but is it the actual artwork that inspires or is it the artist’s vision and inspiration? "Some Parts Might Be Greater than the Whole" sought to explore how and where inspiration is found. Through community engagement, the San Francisco-based artist Josh Greene used the Museum gallery as a “safe zone” to allow relationships to move forward and develop.

Jarbas Lopes: Cicloviaérea

Jarbas Lopes: Cicloviaérea
On September 7, 2007, Brazilian artist Jarbas Lopes kicked off the Social Studies residency program at the Museum making his work…in the Museum. Artists, students, children, bicycle enthusiasts and anyone else interested in learning about his creative process were invited to join him. Jarbas Lopes of Rio de Janeiro worked in one Museum gallery space converted into a workshop-studio, using the space as a laboratory for creativity and community collaborations. Museum visitors engaged the process to explore his utopia of alternative transportation. Using bicycles, sculpture, drawing, installation, video and performance, Lopes built the work within the gallery and then took it into our city.